Introduction & Strategy

BACKGROUND

0.1 A Local Plan sets out the local planning authority's detailed policies and proposals for the future development and use of land. The Local Plan is a statutory document, which means the Council are legally required to produce one. The Local Plan is the first point of reference when dealing with planning applications. The Local Plan must take account of Government policy on planning and must be in line with policy set at both the Regional and County level. In addition the Local Plan should translate the aims of other Council Strategies into landuse proposals or controls. In particular, the Local Plan should be clearly linked to the Community Strategy and Council Vision.

0.2 The previous Local Plan for Pendle was adopted in January 1999. It covers the period 1991 - 2001 and is now out of date. There are a number of reasons why the Local Plan must be reviewed:

  1. A Regional Spatial Strategy for the North West is now in place.
  2. The Joint Lancashire Structure Plan covering the period 2001-2016 has been prepared.
  3. More recent Planning Policy Guidance Notes and Planning Policy Statements have emerged from national Government, such as PPG3 (Housing), PPG25 (Flood Risk), PPG13 (Transport), PPS1 (Delivering Sustainable Development), PPS22 (Renewable Energy), PPS7 (Sustainable Development in Rural Areas), PPS6 (Town Centres) and PPS9 (Biodiversity and Geological Conservation.
  4. Changing local circumstances, such as the preparation of Area Development Frameworks for parts of Nelson, Brierfield and Colne.
  5. The introduction of Parts 1, 2 and 3 of the Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act and the Transitional Arrangements Regulations that apply to Local Plan making.

PREPARING THE LOCAL PLAN

0.3 The Local Plan together with the Regional Spatial Strategy for the North West (RPG13), Joint Lancashire Structure Plan and County Minerals and Waste Plan (or Local Development Framework) forms the Development Plan for Pendle. The process of preparing the Replacement Pendle Local Plan (2001-2016) is detailed below:

 

FORMAT OF THE LOCAL PLAN

0.4 This Pendle Local Plan replaces the existing Local Plan (1991 - 2001). The Local Plan is based on a Strategy and a set of landuse policies.

0.5 The Strategy sets out the overall direction of the Plan and the aims which the Council wants to achieve. Each Policy is designed to implement those aims through landuse planning decisions. Policies are grouped under topic headings. Each Policy is followed by a clear justification which elaborates on the policy, provides explanation of terms used in the policy wording and highlights the national, regional and county policy context. The Local Plan also contains a Proposals Map.

Topics included in the Local Plan are:

  • Environment
  • Housing
  • Employment
  • Town Centres and Retail Development
  • Transport
  • Community, Recreation and Leisure

0.6 The Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act introduced fundamental changes to the Development Plan system. The primary changes involve the abolition of County Structure Plans and Local Plans and the creation of Local Development Frameworks (LDF). These are to be prepared by the Local Planning Authority.

0.7 In December 2002 the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister issued a statement on the transitional arrangements for the move from the current system of development planning to that introduced through the new Act. In this statement the Government encourages Local Planning Authorities to take account of the principles of the proposed new system. The Transitional Arrangements Regulations provide further advice. The table below identifies those key principles and the way they have been interpreted in the preparation of this Plan.

ODPM Local Development Document Principles
Pendle Local Plan Response
Table 1 – Transitional Arrangements
Set out a clear strategic vision for the Plan area
Pendle Borough Council have prepared a vision as part of the Council's Community Strategy. This vision is used as a basis for the direction of landuse policy in the Local Plan.
Write more succinct text and policies
Policy in this Local Plan is written in a concise manner. Previous Policy which lacks direction or brings little to development control decisions has been removed.
Cut out unnecessary or repetitive policies
Guidance is contained in PPGs, PPSs, RSS and the Joint Lancashire Structure Plan. This policy will be referenced, but not repeated. In some instances this policy will be built on to provide local policy appropriate to Pendle.
Provide greater local focus in policies
Only policy advice which affects Pendle will be included.
Achieve effective community participation in developing polices
This Local Plan has been placed on two periods of formal Deposit. Local Plan policies are based on the response to the Key Issues Report and a number of research studies which have involved public participation. See Community Involvement Matrix below.

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT MATRIX

0.8 One of the key aims of the Government’s changes is to increase community involvement in the plan making process. This matrix outlines the level of community involvement which has taken place during the preparation of the Local Plan.

Local Plan StageCommunity InvolvementStage Complete
Monitoring – e.g. Employment Land Availability, Retail Survey
Monitoring in-house, based on factual information from on the ground research and planning permissions. Documents released into public domain and considered by Committee. Up-dated where necessary.
Yes
Research - e.g. Retail Capacity Study, Urban Capacity Study
In-house research or Consultant research. 6 week public consultation on adopted UCS. Documents available to public and considered by Committee. Up-dated where necessary.
Yes
Key Issues Report
10 week public consultation on key issues. Leaflet/feedback questionnaire distributed to every household and business in the Borough. Borough wide exhibitions. Response document considered by Committee.
Yes
1st Deposit Local Plan
6 week formal consultation period. Posters, leaflets and staff available to answer queries. Document considered by Elected Members prior to Deposit.
Yes
Re-deposit Local Plan
6 week formal consultation period. Revised document considered by Elected Members prior to Re-deposit.
Yes
Public Local Inquiry
Formal Inquiry to deal with representations.
Yes

BACKGROUND

0.9 A key aim of the Local Plan is to contribute towards the regeneration of Pendle. The future of Pendle hinges on achieving a balance between the economic, social and environmental well being of the Borough and providing an improved quality of life for its citizens. The Local Plan aims to achieve this balance under the ideal of sustainable development which seeks to meet current needs, as well as improving people’s well being without irreparably damaging the environment or, compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs.

0.10 Under the umbrella of sustainable development the Local Plan contains policies which promote economic prosperity, encourage a cohesive and inclusive society and foster a high quality environment. Individual policies are linked to other policies and chapters and at the end of each policy chapter a Sustainability Balance diagram highlights the balance sought through the policies.

VISION

0.11 The Council together with the Local Strategic Partnership have endorsed a Community Strategy for Pendle. The Community Strategy is based on the following vision:

A Borough that provides a high quality of life for all its citizens and that is known regionally and nationally as a great place to live, learn, work and visit.

0.12 Achieving the vision will rely on promoting social cohesion and tackling the substantial levels of deprivation in the Borough through the following objectives:

S

T

R

A

N

1
Creating confident communities that are socially cohesive, tolerant and that consider the needs of all ages and cultures;
2
Promoting the quality of the Borough’s environment and seeking to achieve sustainable development;
3
Creating a vibrant, competitive and healthy local economy that provides a wide range of employment opportunities;
4
Providing high quality education that ensures that all the Borough’s residents are able to achieve the best they can;
5
Developing a Borough in which people can live and work without fear;
6
Creating a vibrant housing market that will offer high quality and affordable housing for all;
7
Offering people access to quality health and social care and opportunities to pursue a healthy lifestyle; and
8
Offering an attractive range of cultural and leisure activities.

0.13 The Local Plan is one vehicle through which the Vision can be translated into action. The Vision, together with policy guidance from Planning Policy Guidance Notes (PPGs), Planning Policy Statements (PPSs), the Regional Spatial Strategy (RSS) (former RPG 13) and the Joint Lancashire Structure Plan (JLSP) has helped shape the direction of future policy and establish clear aims and objectives for land use planning in Pendle. These aims and objectives are reinforced by the responses received to the Key Issues Report, prepared for consultation in June 2002 as the first stage in the Local Plan review. 

0.14 The following sections present the aims and direction of the revised Local Plan policy. For each topic, a clear strategy background is presented, based on guidance and Policy from PPGs, PPSs, the RSS, the Joint Lancashire Structure Plan and relevant strategy documents. Following this, a table presents the findings of the Key Issues Report and the response which has helped formulate policy direction. This in turn will be linked to the Vision, whereby each element of policy can be traced back to one or a number of the relevant strands which encompass the Council Vision.

ENVIRONMENT

0.15 The Borough has a distinct environmental character, which should be recognised by all as an important asset. The planning process can help to increase the awareness of the importance of Pendle’s environment, which contains sharp contrasts between remote upland moors and densely populated industrial valley landscapes and covers a historical timeframe ranging from prehistoric sites to modern textile mills.

0.16 Pendle Borough Council have produced a Local Agenda 21 Strategy. This seeks to create a sustainable future for Pendle. The underlying principles of sustainable development seek a balance between environmental, social and economic issues.

0.17 In order to create an attractive place where people choose to live, work and partake in recreation, it is essential to conserve and enhance Pendle’s most valued natural and built environments. The Local Plan highlights and encourages the conservation and enhancement of the Borough’s distinctive character. Included within this is the need to conserve and enhance Pendle’s ecological biodiversity. However, protection and enhancement of the natural and built environment goes only part way to meeting the ideal of a sustainable community. It is equally important to allow change in order to secure both social and economic progress. The relationship between new development and the natural and built environment is important. The policies in the Local Plan seek to ensure that new developments make a positive contribution to Pendle’s natural and built environment. For example, the North West Sustainable Communities Plan1 highlights that developers and planners should take the historic environment into account and should use it as a positive influence in new developments. What is of fundamental importance is that the best examples of the natural and built environment are protected.

1ODPM (2005) - Sustainable Communities in the North West. ODPM 

0.18 Environmental protection can itself provide both economic and social benefits. In particular, a quality natural and built environment will make Pendle an attractive place where firms choose to invest, tourists choose to visit and a focus for conservation led regeneration to boost the local housing market.

IssuePolicy Direction / Landuse AimVision Strand
Policy Formulated in Local Plan?
Policy Direction
Green previously developed land in exchange for development in the urban fringe.
Not to be progressed as a policy option in the Local Plan. Look at ways of greening urban areas without swapping for land in urban fringe.
n/a
No
Policy on open
space provides for
green space in
urban areas
Review Green Belt boundaries.
Exceptional circumstances required for review of Green Belt boundaries.
1
2
3
Yes
Protect and enhance valued environments.
Policy to protect and enhance the Borough’s most valued environments.
1
2
8
Yes
Encourage development of renewable energy forms.
Policy to promote renewable energy developments in appropriate locations.
2
3
7
Yes
Restrict all but essential development from floodplains.
Policy in line with PPG25 and Environment Agency guidelines.
2
3
5
Yes
Create additional Conservation Areas.
Policy to control development in Conservation Areas. Identify and consult on additional Conservation Areas.
2
6
8
Yes

HOUSING

0.19 ODPM (2003)2 highlight the contrasting situation in our communities in England. In some areas homes are unaffordable, but in other areas homes are being abandoned. The Government recognise the importance of providing decent homes and a good quality local environment in all regions. Some of Pendle is suffering from housing market collapse, and without intervention the situation will worsen.

2ODPM (2003) Sustainable Communities: Building for the Future. ODPM 

0.20 Much of the current housing stock in Pendle was built for economic conditions which no longer exist. Currently over 60% of Pendle’s housing is attributed to pre 1919 terraced housing (Borough of Pendle, 2002). The Area Development Frameworks (ADFs) which have recently been produced for Colne, Brierfield and Nelson highlight that there are problems in relation to vacant dwellings and those which require investment to make them healthy and safe within these towns. As part of the future master planning work a more detailed assessment will be undertaken to understand better the reasons for the housing vacancies to help establish those that are vacant due to low demand rather than any other reasons. Solutions will then be developed which are based on the findings of the master planning.

0.21 Such housing is becoming increasingly unpopular and socially obsolete, suggesting that the housing market is not meeting the needs and aspirations of its community and is failing to attract new residents in to the urban areas of Pendle. The Council’s Community Strategy (2003) recognises that Pendle must deal with the massive problems of redundant and unfit housing and states that problems are particularly rife in Nelson, Colne and Brierfield. Government support through the Housing Market Renewal programme will provide necessary intervention to improve some of the worst areas of the Borough.

0.22 The Housing Market Renewal initiative has identified 9 pathfinder areas throughout England. Partnerships of local authorities and other key stakeholders have developed strategic plans for whole housing markets to ensure problems are not displaced elsewhere. Pendle is part of the East Lancashire Pathfinder. ODPM (2003) states that strategic plans should ‘entail radical and sustained action to replace obsolete housing with modern sustainable accommodation’. The improvements will not concentrate on housing alone, but will seek to create sustainable communities through addressing problems in relation to health, education, employment and the environment.

0.23 The Local Plan highlights those intervention areas of Pendle and can provide a framework for the delivery of some initiatives. In particular the Local Plan can address the need for a greater choice in the housing market and can assist with the aim of providing a decent home for everyone.

0.24 Running in tandem with the issue of regeneration is a recognition of the need to maintain economic growth and provide new housing provision to meet the needs of emerging households and support inward investment. The Regional Spatial Strategy for the North West (RSS) requires 2,690 dwellings to be built per annum in Lancashire. This is based on household projection figures. The Joint Lancashire Structure Plan translates this into a requirement of 1,970 dwellings to be provided in Pendle to 2016. This is over and above any new dwellings to be provided as a result of clearance.

New dwellings to be provided should follow a search sequence in order to identify the most sustainable location for development. In line with the RSS and the JLSP, the sequential approach should be as follows; the reuse of existing buildings, the reuse of previously developed land and then the use of previously undeveloped land within the urban area. In order to make the most efficient use of land, housing densities should be increased in suitable locations, especially in areas of good public transport accessibility. The need to provide choice in the housing market is of utmost importance with a recognition that affordable housing should be provided where necessary. Providing choice may also mean reducing densities in some areas to provide larger family housing.

IssuePolicy Direction / Landuse AimVision StrandPolicy Formulated in Local Plan?
Unfit and obsolete housing does not provide for the community.Identify renewal areas in the Local Plan period.1
2
5
6
No
Identified as part of the Housing Market Renewal Pathfinder.
Encourage housing renewal, including clearance and demolition.
In the context of the Housing Market Renewal Pathfinder, consider clearance and refurbishment.
1
2
5
6
Yes
Re-use previously developed land for housing.
Urban Capacity Study identifies brownfield capacity within Pendle. Devise policy to target new housing development towards brownfield land.
2
6
Yes
Provide modern housing.
Local Plan policy will seek to achieve a mix of housing type to meet density requirements and provide greater choice.
1
5
6
Yes
Provide affordable housing.
Local Plan policy to allow affordable housing as an exception where there is an identified need.
1
6
Yes
Encourage high density housing development.
Local Plan policy will seek to achieve a mix of housing type to meet density requirements. This will be balanced with the need to provide choice in the housing market.
2
6
Yes

EMPLOYMENT

0.26 The Pendle economy and much of East Lancashire’s economy is dominated by a largely uncompetitive manufacturing industry. The Council’s Economic Development Strategy (2003) recognises that three sectors play an important role in the success of manufacturing in Pendle, namely; Aerospace and Precision Engineering, Textiles and Furniture. Pendle’s reliance on the manufacturing sector for employment remains one of the highest in the country and is significantly higher than the national average of 15% (Borough of Pendle, 2003).

0.27 Despite the success of the manufacturing sector, in recent years Pendle has experienced a substantial change in its employment structure. In 2000 employment in manufacturing had fallen to 39% of total employment in Pendle (in 1979 the figure was 54%) (Borough of Pendle 2003). Much of the manufacturing sector in Pendle is in need of urgent modernisation and little land is available for expansion or inward investment. Consequently firms are choosing to locate elsewhere and many traditional mill premises have been redeveloped for housing.

0.28 The stock of industrial and business premises is largely constrained by quality. In particular much of the stock is poorly located with inadequate access, many requiring heavy goods vehicles to travel through residential areas. Furthermore many sites are small and unsuitable for modern day industry. A study by the University of Cambridge (2002) identified the need to provide additional land for the development of business and industrial parks that enable expansion of growing local companies and attract inward investment. In addition the Economic Development Strategy (2003) seeks to bring forward a hierarchy of economic development sites to meet the needs of Pendle.

0.29 The views of the Council’s own strategies and research findings are reinforced in both the Regional Spatial Strategy and the Joint Lancashire Structure Plan. In particular, the Regional Spatial Strategy for the North West (RSS) seeks to redress the balance between the prosperous areas of the North West and those areas where there has been difficulty in attracting growth and investment. To achieve this, parts of the North West, including Pendle, have been identified as Regeneration Priority Areas where the RSS requires the development plan to enhance the attractiveness of the area to potential investors. In particular the RSS seeks the provision of sites which are able to meet the need for expansion and relocation of traditional manufacturing as well as the needs of inward investors.

0.30 The Joint Lancashire Structure Plan identifies a need for 40 hectares of employment land in Pendle. This includes a 25% increase to encourage expansion and inward investment in the Regeneration Priority Areas. The Plan also states that existing Local Plan allocations should be assessed to gauge their continued suitability for business and industrial uses. Unsuitable sites should be de-allocated or allocated for other uses. New office development should be located in the main town centres or at transport hubs or accessibility corridors in the urban area.

IssuePolicy Direction / Landuse AimVision StrandPolicy Formulated in Local Plan?
Policy Direction
Encourage new firms and the growth of existing businesses.
Local Plan policy will seek to provide the necessary employment opportunity, so as to encourage new investment, and the expansion of existing businesses.
1
3
Yes
Availability of quality employment land.
Conclusion/policy direction to be assessed on the findings of the Cambridge Study.
2
3
5
Yes
Retention of industrial sites in residential areas.
Local Plan policy should seek to retain existing industrial sites where suitable uses can be found and they do not conflict with residential amenity.
1
2
3
5
Yes
Emphasis of housing rather than employment on previously developed land.
Devise policy to target new housing development towards brownfield land. Re-use existing industrial land for housing and/or employment in suitable locations.
1
2
6
Yes
Allocation of greenfield land for employment in sustainable locations.
Conclusion/policy direction to be assessed on the findings of the Cambridge Study.
2
3
Yes

TOWN CENTRES AND RETAIL DEVELOPMENT

0.31 Planning Policy Statement 6 (Planning for Town Centres) seeks to create vitality and viability in town centres and local shopping centres. In Pendle attractive and prosperous centres provide job opportunities and create attractive areas in which to live and work. All 6 towns in Pendle have centres which are underpinned by retail and service facilities. Nelson, Colne and Barnoldswick are regarded as 'Town Centres', whilst the smaller towns of Earby, Brierfield and Barrowford have 'Local Shopping Centres'.

0.32 The traditional role of the centres has been affected over recent years by the dispersal of population, jobs and shops. In particular there has been an increased dependency on the private car, coupled with the development of out-of-town retail centres. Both the trends in retail and transport have served to undermine local centres, resulting in high vacancy rates and derelict sites. This in turn has led to further competition with neighbouring towns such as Burnley and Skipton.

0.33 With a 'Vision' underpinned by the principles of sustainable development, it is recognised that viable local centres are an essential element in seeking a reduction in car travel. In addition local centres better serve those without access to a private car.

IssuePolicy Direction / Landuse AimVision StrandPolicy Formulated in Local Plan?
Policy Direction
Supply of food-retailing in Pendle.
Policy in line with sequentialapproach and restrict out-of-town and edge-of-town food store development.
3
8
Yes
Supply of non-food retailing in Pendle.
Local Plan policy should seek toencourage and be proactive toward non – food retailing. Suitable sites should be identified in the Local Plan.
3
8
Yes
Location of new retail and service development.
Local Plan policy should seek to encourage a sequential approach to retail development.
2
3
Yes
Appropriate uses within town centres and local shopping centres.
Local Plan policy should seek to encourage a mix of uses in town centres, but not to the detriment of existing and future retail development.
1
3
5
8
Yes
Re-definition of core retail area.
The Local Plan review provides opportunity for town centre boundaries to be re–defined and concentrated. Concentration must also recognise the need of future demand, and must not be to the detriment of town centre regeneration.
2
3
8
Yes
Environmental Enhancement.
Pendle Borough Council should continue to bid for funding and provide grant assistance through regeneration initiatives, in the context of Local Plan policy.
2
5
8
No
Work to be
undertaken by
Regeneration
Unit.

TRANSPORT

0.34 Planning Policy Guidance Note 13: Transport (PPG13) claims that ‘by shaping the pattern of development and influencing the location, scale, density, design and mix of land uses, planning can help to reduce the need to travel, reduce length of journeys and make it safer and easier for people to access jobs, shops, leisure facilities and services by public transport, walking and cycling’.

0.35 In Pendle it is necessary to move towards a sustainable future where the creation of a robust competitive local economy, a decent home for everyone and commercially viable town centres is paramount. The main objectives of PPG13 are to promote accessibility to jobs and services whilst encouraging more sustainable transport choices and reducing the need to travel by car. In order to support the Housing Market Renewal initiative and encourage economic prosperity it is vital to locate new development in Pendle in accessible places. It is also important to encourage people to use forms of travel other than the car, consequently new development should be located in public transport corridors and should be easily accessible by cycling and walking. Improvements to the public transport network and an integrated approach to public transport, cycling and walking will help make Pendle a more attractive place in which to live, work and spend shopping or leisure time. In particular, the proposed Rapid Transit System involves a comprehensive approach to public transport provision. It is intended to improve the public transport system by upgrading existing infrastructure, improving frequency and enhancing the local environment. In addition, creating a place where people choose to live, work, shop and enjoy their leisure pursuits will serve to curtail commuting thus reducing the number of car borne trips. The Joint Lancashire Structure Plan (2005) seeks an integrated approach to transport planning, enhanced public transport and management of car parking.

0.36 An essential ingredient to the regeneration of Pendle is good quality transport links with adjoining areas. This will serve to attract inward investment and retain existing employers and populations. The Regional Spatial Strategy for the North West (2003) states that it is critical to the economic competitiveness of the Region that transport systems are modern, efficient and very well integrated. The location of Nelson and Colne adjacent to the M65 and its recent link to the M6 has opened up the district to the national motorway network. However, road links from Pendle into Yorkshire remain difficult. Improved cross-border linkages (either road and/or rail) will enhance Pendle’s position as a place in which to live and work.

Issue
Policy Direction / Landuse Aim
Vision Strand
Policy Formulated in Local Plan?
Policy Direction
Improved transportation links to major centres by both private and public transport.
Policy to support the protection of the former Colne-Skipton Railway line as a transport corridor for future transport use. Policy to encourage improved public transport through the Light Rapid Transit System and Community Rail Partnerships.
2
3
7
8
Yes
New development in accessible locations.
Policy to encourage new development towards accessible locations and identify suitable sites for housing and employment development.
2
3
5
6
7
8
Yes
Housing and
Employment
Chapters
Revision of car parking standards in new development.
Adopt LCC Maximum car parking standards which have been subject to public consultation
2
Yes
Improvements to travel, other than the car.
Policy to seek alternatives to the car, making public transport an attractive alternative.
2
7
8
Yes

COMMUNITY, RECREATION AND LEISURE

0.37 Reducing social inequality and providing for a range of accessible facilities has an integral part to play in the overall regeneration of Pendle. Planning has historically had a limited role to play in reducing social inequality, but the concept of sustainability has now meant that community facilities can be located in areas accessible by a choice in the means of transportation.

0.38 Access is a key component for sustainable communities and is also linked to social inclusion. A lack of accessible facilities could significantly impact on the quality of life of vulnerable groups such as the old, disabled and those on low income. It is important therefore to retain existing services, and also to maintain and improve access to them.

0.39 PPG17 (Planning for Open Space, Sport and Recreation) supports this stance for community sustainability by recognising that sport and recreation are important aspects of civilised life. Open spaces should be protected from development, with new provision in areas of deficiency.

0.40 The Regional Spatial Strategy for the North West encourages the provision of facilities for education and training as well as the provision of other facilities necessary to local communities. This approach is also defined in the Joint Lancashire Structure Plan, which states that local shopping, leisure and service provision has an important role to play in the social and economic well being of rural communities.

IssuePolicy Direction/ Landuse AimVision StrandPolicy Formulated in Local Plan?
Policy Direction
Retention of existing open space.
Local plan policy will seek to conserve, maintain andenhance existing open space provision.
1
2
7
8
Yes
New open space should be provided in areas of deficiency.
Local Plan policy willencourage open space in areas of deficiency. Policy will require new development to provide an element of open space or a commuted sum for provision elsewhere in the neighbourhood.
1
2
4
7
8
Yes
Urban areas should be greened by
regenerating previously developed land to provide open spaces.
The Local Plan identifies Housing Market Renewal intervention areas. Open space will be promoted as part of any housing regeneration scheme.
1
2
5
6
8
Yes
The development of land for housing or employment should help secure the provision of improved community facilities.
The Local Plan will seek the provision of community facilities as part of new developments, either through the provision of facilities or commuted sums.
2
3
7
8
Yes
Improve access to the countryside.
Local Plan policy will seek to improve access in to the countryside in line with the Council’s Countryside Access Strategy. New development will be resisted in areas where it would reduce accessibility to the open countryside
1
2
5
7
8
Yes

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Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the electronic version of the Replacement Pendle Local Plan 2001-2016 is as accurate as possible. However, in some instances, the appearance of the Proposals Map online may differ slightly from the paper version due to issues with electronic displays. If users are in any doubt about the content of the Proposals Map please verify the information by referring to the published paper edition as this represents the definitive version of the Local Plan.